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the motorcycle leans. The greater the
speed, the more the motorcycle must lean.
When you are near the end of the curve,
gradually release the pressure on the hand
grip to bring the motorcycle upright. If
necessary, push on the opposite hand grip
to assist in straightening the motorcycle.

Many motorcycle riders, especially
those who lack experience, misjudge the
safest speed for curves and enter curves
when travelling too quickly.
• If necessary, reduce your speed and
   downshift before the curve.
• When road or weather conditions are
   poor, reduce your speed further.
• Look well ahead and keep your eyes
   looking through the curve to where you
   want to go.
• Push-steer to lean the motorcycle in the
   direction of the curve.
• Avoid slowing or accelerating suddenly
   while in the curve when the motorcycle
   is leaning. The sudden change in
   speed could cause the motorcycle to
   lose traction.
• You can apply both brakes in a curve
   in an emergency, but do not do
   this while the motorcycle is leaning.
   Before applying the brakes, bring the
   motorcycle upright, and take care not
   to lock either wheel. Using threshold
   braking will help prevent locking.
• Gently accelerate when you are nearing
   the end of the curve.

Skids

Skids are the result of:
• improper use of the throttle, clutch, and
   brakes
• improper or unsafe handling of the
   motorcycle for the road conditions
• turning or steering too sharply,
   especially on a curve or turn
• turning while travelling too quickly
• braking too hard, usually with the
   rear brake
• accelerating too quickly
• the combined effects of braking
   and turning

The effect of these rider errors can be
made worse by poor road conditions, such
as slippery surfaces, loose sand, or gravel.

Try not to get into a skid. Plan ahead
so you will not be forced to make rapid
adjustments. When you are not familiar
with the road, reduce your speed.

If a skid occurs, do not panic. Look and
steer in the direction you want to go, to
help you regain control of the motorcycle.

 

CHAPTER FOUR                                                               THE BASICS OF SAFE OPERATING AND RIDING  31

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