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   It allows you:
• time and space to take action
   to avoid a hazard or collision
• an escape route if stopping is
   not possible
• to reduce the risk of having another
   vehicle collide with you from behind
• to be seen more easily by drivers of
   vehicles coming toward you, from the
   sides, and from behind
• more time to respond to the actions
   of others

Space cushion to the front

• Your following distance is the space
   that is completely controlled by you.
   Managing your space to the rear and
   sides can be more challenging, but you,
   the rider, manage the space ahead.
• Create and maintain a safe following
   distance. The closer you follow another
   vehicle, the greater your risk of colliding
   with it. You will also not have enough
   time to see and respond to hazards in
   your lane, like pot holes and debris.
• Stay at least two to three seconds
   behind the vehicle ahead. 
• At higher speeds, or when conditions
   are less than ideal, such as poor light
   or poor weather, stay at least three to
   four seconds behind the vehicle you
   are following.




A minimum two to three second following 
distance is recommended. When conditions are 
not ideal, increase your following distance.

 

Space cushion behind

• Use your mirrors to be aware of vehicles
   behind you.
• If a vehicle behind you is following too
   closely, reduce your speed slightly to
   allow the vehicle to pass and to increase
   your following distance from the vehicle
   in front of you. This will allow you more
   time and space to slow or stop gradually,
   giving you more options to deal with the
   vehicle behind you. This reduces the risk
   of being hit from behind.

Space cushion to the sides

• To have a space cushion beside you,
   avoid riding beside another vehicle or
   riding in the blind spot of the vehicle in
   the next lane. The driver of the vehicle
   might move into your lane without doing
   a shoulder check.
• Do not ride beside another motorcycle
   in the same lane. It is illegal and you will
   have fewer options for an escape route.
• Avoid riding close to the edge of
   your lane or to the curb, as this may
   encourage other drivers to move into
   your lane.

Space cushion and
large vehicles

• Create a wide space between you and
   large vehicles. Drivers of these vehicles
   often have large blind spots behind
   and to the sides of their vehicles. If you
   follow a large vehicle too closely, the
   driver will not be able to see you. Your
   view of the road ahead will be reduced,
   and drivers of oncoming vehicles will be
   less able to see you.

CHAPTER FIVE                                                                                    MANAGING RISK IN TRAFFIC  35

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