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Two lane roadway
(one lane in each direction)

The left portion of a lane, where the left
wheels of a vehicle travel, is usually the
safest place to ride on a two lane roadway.
In this position you can:
• be seen more easily by oncoming vehicles
• be seen more easily in rear view mirrors
   of vehicles you are following
• see oncoming vehicles more easily
• see and be seen by traffic at road
   junctions to your left
• be farther away from vehicles entering
   from the right
• be farther away from pedestrians,
   animals, driveways and road debris
   along the curb
• avoid the slippery areas caused by
   leaks from vehicles that can form in
   the centre of the lane
• avoid the centre of the lane that is often
   higher due to constant traffic weight on
   the left and right portions of the lane

These points explain why it is best to
use the left portion of the lane. However,
there are times when it is safer to use the
right portion and occasionally the centre
portion of the lane to see, be seen, and
manage your space cushion.

There is no lane position that is safest for
all situations. Here are some other situations
where you must decide where in your lane it
is safest to ride:
• Before the crest of a hill, use the right
   portion of your lane. An oncoming
   vehicle may be coming over the hill and
   using your lane to pass.
• When riding around a curve, choose a
   position in your lane that will allow the
   best view along the curve ahead.

• A large vehicle coming toward you can
   cause a change in wind conditions. It
   can block a strong crosswind or create
   a strong wind as it passes, which can
   cause you to lose control. When a
   large vehicle is approaching, ride in
   the right portion of your lane and keep
   a firm hold on the hand grips. Wait
   for a few seconds after the vehicle
   has passed before returning to your
   previous lane position.

 

Move to the right portion of your lane to prepare 
for a change in wind conditions.

Changing lanes

Changing lanes frequently is not worth the
risks. Plan your route well ahead to keep
lane changing to a minimum.

When a lane change is required,
do the following:
• Make sure the lane change location is
   safe and legal.
• Check for traffic and potential hazards
   ahead. Use your mirrors to check for
   traffic behind you.
• Check your blind spot by glancing over
   your shoulder to the lane where you
   intend to move.
• Turn on your signal light and use a hand
   signal (optional).
• Do a shoulder check again and, if it is
   safe, change lanes. If it is not safe, start
   the lane change process again.

CHAPTER FIVE                                                                                   MANAGING RISK IN TRAFFIC  37
 

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