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   passenger. The way you brake depends
   on the type of brake you have on the
   sidecar. Check your owner’s manual for
   more information.
• If the sidecar does not have a brake,
   or the sidecar brake is not adjusted
   correctly, be aware that the sidecar can
   cause the motorcycle and sidecar unit
   to pull to the left during braking. Extra
   effort on the handgrips will be required
   by the driver to keep it tracking straight.
• When braking, sidecars can cause the
   motorcycle sidecar unit to pull away
   from its intended path. This will require
   the rider to make steering adjustments
   to compensate.

Curves

• The sidecar may make the motorcycle
   more difficult to control so reduce speed
   when approaching curves. You must drive
   more slowly in a curve than you would
   with a motorcycle without a sidecar.

Turns

• You must slow down before a
   turn. Gear down one or two gears,
   depending on the angle of the turn
   and the speed of your approach.
• To turn right, shift your weight to the right
   and point the front wheel around the
   turn. After the midpoint of the turn has
  been reached, and you begin to turn the
   handle bar back to go straight, you can
   gently accelerate out of the turn.
• The right turn must be done very
   carefully. Because a motorcycle and 
  

   sidecar unit is off centre, the left push
   of centrifugal force may cause a sidecar
   to lift in a right turn. If the sidecar lifts,
   increase the effort to turn the handlebar
   smoothly to the right. This will keep the 
   whole unit turning right and prevent it
   from being pushed to the left.
• To turn left, shift your weight to the left.
   This helps to keep the rear wheel of the
   motorcycle on the ground, and reduces
   the effort required to steer.

 

 56 A Rider's Guide to Operation, Safety and Licensing 

 

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