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Purpose of daily
vehicle inspections

The purpose of a daily vehicle inspection is
to ensure the early identification of a vehicle
problem and defects before the vehicle
is operated on the highway. Inspections
prevent the operation of a vehicle with
conditions that are likely to cause or
contribute to the severity of a collision.

The trip inspection process is part of
a carrier’s legal requirement to have and
implement a written maintenance program.
It also ensures there is clear communication
within the company about the vehicle’s day-
to-day safety.

Inspection reports serve as
communication between drivers, the carrier
and the carrier’s maintenance department.
Reports are used to verify inspections,
record defects, report defects and may be
used to verify repairs. Reports are completed
immediately following an inspection.

A brief overview of the daily inspection
program includes:
• The driver conducts an inspection on a
   vehicle or combination of vehicles.
• The inspection is conducted with the
   use of a schedule which lists the vehicle
   components and systems that require
   inspection.
• The driver completes a report
   of the inspection.
• The inspection and report are
   valid for 24 hours.
• The driver is to carry the schedule and
   report in the vehicle.
• The driver records any defects found
   during the inspection, while en route
   and at the end of the trip or day.
• The driver reports defects to the carrier. 

Vehicles that require
inspections

Provincially regulated carriers (those
that operate solely within Alberta) must
complete trip inspection reports on:
• Trucks registered for a weight of 11,794
   kilograms and greater; and
• Commercial passenger vehicles with a
   designed seating capacity of 11 or more
   persons, including the driver.

Federally regulated carriers (those that
operate one or more vehicles outside the
province of Alberta) must complete trip
inspection reports on:
• Trucks registered for a weight of 4,500
   kilograms and greater; and
• Commercial passenger vehicles with a
   designed seating capacity of 11 or more 
   persons, including the driver.

A “commercial vehicle” is defined as
a vehicle operated on a highway by or
on behalf of a person for the purpose
of providing transportation but does not
include a private passenger vehicle.

Vehicle defects

Recording defects

The driver is required to record a defect
on the report immediately after the initial
inspection or upon discovery of a defect
while travelling or when discovered at the
end of a trip or day.

 

26   A Commercial Driver’s Guide to Operation, Safety and Licensing

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