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Step 5 (Air system leaks)

Push both park control valves and
rebuild air pressure.
Turn off the engine.
Apply and firmly hold a full service brake
application for 2 minutes.
Maximum 4 PSI (28 kPa) loss for power
units, plus an additional 2 PSI (14 kPa)
per trailer, after the system stabilizes.
Release service brake application and
reapply spring park brakes.

Step 6 (Service brake
response)

Remove wheel chocks.
Release spring park brakes.
Perform a brake response test using the
foot valve.
Perform a brake response test using the
trailer hand valve.

Enroute check stop
inspections

Rest and check stops serve two purposes.
First, they provide a break and a change
of routine. You will feel less tired and more
alert after a rest stop. Second, you can
check your vehicle after it has been on the
road for some time. You will be able to see
if everything is still secure and working the
way it should.

Schedule rest and check stops
according to National Safety Code (NSC)
requirements and your company’s policy.
When choosing a stop, keep the
following in mind:
• Make sure the vehicle is completely
off the road.

• You should be able to enter and exit a
rest or check stop so that you do not
have to back the vehicle.
• Do not make a stop at the bottom of a
hill or on an uphill slope.
• The stop area should have an adequate
acceleration lane to allow you to
merge on to the highway at the
appropriate speed.

A vehicle inspection at a rest and check
stop should include the following:
• All lights are clean and in working order.
• There are no air leaks.
• All the wheels are secure, and tires are
properly inflated and are not hot.
• There are no broken or loose items on
the vehicle.
• The load is secure.
• The dangerous goods placards are
clean and secure (if applicable).
• The trailer locking mechanisms are
secure and in good condition.
• The brakes are properly adjusted.

Reporting to a
vehicle inspection
station

One of the most common misconceptions
regarding vehicle inspection stations is
that only large commercial vehicles have
to report. The law is that all commercial
vehicles or combinations weighing over
4,500 kg are required to report to inspection
stations when the highway lights are
flashing. A “commercial vehicle” is defined
as a vehicle operated on a highway by
or on behalf of a person for the purpose
of providing transportation but does not
include a private passenger vehicle.

36 A Commercial Driver’s Guide to Operation, Safety and Licensing

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