A- A+

Previous Page

Table Of Contents

Next Page

• Having wandering, disconnected thoughts
• Driving the past few kilometres without
   remembering them
• Drifting between lanes, tailgating or
   missing traffic signs
• Noticing a vehicle in the rear view mirror
   that seemed to appear out of nowhere

Most fatigue-related collisions happen
between 1 - 4 p.m. and early in the
morning between 2 - 6 a.m. Typically,
fatigue-related collisions occur at higher
speeds and can result in drivers running off
the road or vehicles colliding head-on with
other vehicles or stationary objects.

How to reduce driver fatigue

Turning up the radio, opening a window,
drinking coffee, chewing gum or eating will
help reduce driver fatigue for short periods
of time but the following actions will help
prevent driver fatigue:
• Become aware of your own biological
   clock and avoid driving during your
   body’s down time.
• Stop if you become sleepy while
   on the road.
• Get plenty of sleep the night
   before a long trip.
• Avoid working all day and then driving
   all night. Stay overnight rather than
   driving straight through.
• Schedule a break every two hours or
   every 160 km. Stretch or take a walk to
   get some fresh air.
• Take a mid-afternoon break.
   Have a 20-40 minute nap.
• Travel with an awake and alert passenger.
   Having someone to chat with will keep
   the driver awake and the passenger
   can also let the driver know if he/she is
   showing any signs of fatigue. 

Railway Crossing

Crossing railway tracks can be especially
hazardous for drivers of large vehicles
because of the following:
• Longer vehicles need to travel further
   and will need more time to clear a
   crossing.
• Heavier vehicles take more time and
   need more room to stop before a
   crossing.
• Larger vehicles are more likely to derail
   a train if there is a collision.

Suggested approach
to stopping

• Slow down, shift to a lower gear if you
   have a manual transmission, and test
   your brakes.
• Check for traffic behind you and then
   stop gradually.
• Stop no closer than five metres (about
   16 feet) and no further than 15 metres
   (about 49 feet) from the nearest rail.
• To better hear a train, roll down the
   window and reduce any noise inside the
   vehicle.
• While stopped, look carefully in each
   direction for approaching trains. Look
   around obstructions such as mirrors
   and windshield pillars.
• When waiting, put on your park brakes
   so that you will not move onto the track.

 

84  A Commercial Driver’s Guide to Operation, Safety and Licensing
 

Previous Page

Table Of Contents

Next Page