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Fueling a vehicle

Gasoline and diesel

• Do not add fuel into the tank when the
engine is running.
• Never overfill the fuel tank.
• In the event of a major or minor fuel
spill, notify the attendant to get it
cleaned up immediately using an
approved absorbent material.
• Do not add fuel close to electrical
sparks or open flame.
• DO NOT SMOKE, and be sure no one
around is smoking.
• Do not use a cell phone while fueling.

Propane

• Only people with the proper certification
or training can refuel a propane vehicle
or container.
• Ensure there is nothing that could ignite
within three metres (10 feet) of the
dispenser or container being filled.
• Wear proper protective gloves and
clothing, such as long sleeve shirts.
• Engine and electrical accessories must
be switched off.
• DO NOT SMOKE, and be sure no one
around is smoking.
• Do not use a cell phone while fueling.

• Properly attach the filling hose to the
vehicle’s fuel tank.
• Open the fixed-liquid level gauge
(bleeder valve).
• When the fuel level reaches the
maximum permitted in the tank, liquid
propane in the form of a mist will be
discharged from the liquid level gauge.
Fueling should now end.
• The fixed level gauge must be shut off
and the fill-line disconnected.
• The magnetic float gauge attached to
the tank should indicate that the tank is
now filled to capacity. The total capacity
of the tank is approximately 80 percent.

Do not fuel a vehicle when the engine
is running or a radio transmitter is on.
Vehicles such as a bus, school bus or taxi
should not be fueled when passengers are
on board. Be sure there is sufficient fuel for
the trip before picking up your passengers.

Fuel efficiency:
A growing priority

The following information has been
provided by Natural Resources Canada
in conjunction with the Government
of Alberta to introduce energyefficient
practices that can reduce fuel
consumption and emissions. FleetSmart
is a component of this program. For more
information on this subject visit this web
site: http://www.transportation.alberta.
ca/4531.htm

As fuel prices fluctuate, independent
drivers and major transport companies
are struggling to accurately budget for fuel
costs and are actively searching for ways
to keep those costs under control.

90 A Commercial Driver’s Guide to Operation, Safety and Licensing

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